Liberia

Ambitious Young Man Interviews Mitch

Mitch: I was interviewed today by Obediah Johnson, a 25 year old reporter for the leading newspaper in Liberia. Obediah has been chasing fire trucks and police cars for 2 years trying to get scoops. When he submits a good story he gets paid. His parents are both dead and he put himself through school this way. He’s still studying at the University and hopes to graduate in a year. When there’s a will, there is most certainly a way. Obediah lives in a slum on the outskirts of Monrovia, in a tiny room with no power, no water and no sanitary facilities. I came away from the interview far more impressed with him than I’m sure he was with me.

By |October 16th, 2012|Liberia, News|2 Comments

Updates from Liberia!

Mitch: Sunday, October 14, 2012 Here’s a quick snapshot from the squatters village we visited today. This family, along with about two-dozen others, moved into a burned down abandoned building. Today was miraculous and completely insane. I don’t have reliable internet so I’ll post more tomorrow if/when I do.Here’s a brief rundown of what we did: Two motorcycles crashed right in front of us A pastor tried to get a bribe from us by lying We visited a squatters village and interviewed people We visited the AFAA house (the orphanage we got our boys from) We went to church and met a returned missionary that started a school and an orphanage and would love our help We went to a revival at the site of a massacre and mass grave from the war…that’s where the pastor asked for a bribe. We drove out to the edge of the city and visited another orphanage that has 88 children in it. While writing this I just got propositioned by a working girl 🙁 which makes me absolutely sick. In sacrament meeting I got emotional because I was thinking about how I couldn’t ask for a better birthday present than to be here with the goal of helping. More tomorrow!

ONLY 2 more days!

ONLY 2 more days until Mitch Weight and the Sahbu Team embark on their journey to Liberia! The team will spend a week delivering school clothing and supplies, and meeting children and parents who cannot afford an education. We already have received many donations and there’s still 2 days left for more items, especially school items like composition books, pencils, pencil sharpeners and erasers! Thank you all for being so generous and supportive of our cause! Stay tuned as Mitch will be providing a live daily blog on how the Liberia trip is unfolding and the special stories of the people he meets along the way.

By |October 10th, 2012|Liberia, News|5 Comments

ONLY 3 more days!

ONLY 3 more days until Mitch Weight and the Sahbu Team embark on their journey to Liberia! The team will spend a week delivering school clothing and supplies, and meeting children and parents who cannot afford education. While in Liberia, Weight said he intends to better his understanding of the hardships faced by many West African youth by meeting with the children and parents he hopes to help. Stay tuned as Mitch will be providing a live daily blog on how the trip is unfolding and the special stories of the people he meets along the way.

Liberia’s Past Threatens Its Future

Over the past 3 decades, religious and political differences have divided what otherwise would have been a well developing and flourishing country. Although a relatively young country, declaring its independence in 1847, Liberia has had an uproarious history. Liberia was suppose to be “a little America,” and a “utopia for abolitionists.” In an area estimated to be the size of Tennessee, the country of Liberia lost one third of its population to neighboring countries beginning in 1989, when the civil war broke out; and over a period of 14 years, the warring factions managed to take approximately 250,000 Liberian lives – that’s equivalent to one out of of 17 people.

Pres Sirleaf Aims to Reduce Poverty by Lifting and Empowering Women Through Skills Training

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf says one of the main goals of her government is to reduce, if not end, poverty – not simply by increasing a woman’s bottom line … Half the Sky, a New York Times bestseller and recent PBS documentary has produced quite a stir on a global scale.  The overarching message was to create awareness and to help establish education and resources for women and children who are not only susceptible to but, often victims of atrocities like maternal mortality, genital mutilation, sex trafficking, forced prostitution and gender-based violence. Liberia is just one country that is facing these problems.

Wide-spread Problem of Human Trafficking, Prostitution and Generalized Oppression of Females

The media is buzzing with references to the PBS documentary airing tonight on the subject of the wide-spread problem of human trafficking, prostitution and generalized  oppression of females called Half the Sky.  We find it particularly interesting because of our interest in educating children and women in Liberia.  President of Liberia, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, spoke at a conference Sunday adding her support to the continuing efforts of humanitarian organizations that have sought to help her country’s citizens.  

“Liberia: No place has ever thrown me so completely – confused me, intimidated me, depressed me, and inspired me.”

The show has shuffled Tony across the world exploring different cultures and their traditional cuisines. Some of his travels have taken him to off the grid locations like Liberia where Bourdain has been personally challenged to a whole new understanding of human existence.These are powerful words coming from world-renowned writer, traveler and food critique, also known for his crass and gritty style. Even Anthony Bourdain couldn’t hold back his feelings during a visit to Liberia in the Travel Channel’s 9th season of the popular show No Reservations.

By |October 1st, 2012|Liberia, Video|8 Comments

The Closest Functioning School is a Three Hour Walk…One Way

What is to become of hundreds of young students in Zuah Town, West Liberia, where the primary school made of mud and palm thatch, already looking abandoned, is on the verge of total collapse? Where are these young students to go and change their meek futures by getting an education? Even the school’s remnants like blackboards, desks and chairs have been damaged beyond repair from lack of care. This feeble and dysfunctional school is the only government run facility in Zuah town. Yet, it sits there in its dilapidated state with no signs of government intervention. The closest functioning school, a three hour walk in one direction, is not even a viable option for any child. NECUS M. ANDREWS, 1 SEPTEMBER 2012 – source