Health

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    Liberia: Your Dirt = Our Garbage Liberia: Your Dirt = Our Garbage

    Liberia: Your Dirt = Our Garbage

Liberia: Your Dirt = Our Garbage

Robust Media reports on the issue of poor sanitation in Monrovia and its environs by the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Reporters & Editors Network of Liberia (WASH R&E) have claimed the attention of the Liberian Senate.   WASH R&E is presently engaged in series of media activities on the filthiness of Monrovia and surrounding communities, as huge pile of garbage can be seen everywhere. The media activities with exclusive focus on sanitation have now become a topical issue on local radio & TV stations and in the local dallies. The on-going WASH Media Focus on Sanitation is considered a national issue and has claimed the attention of Senators at the Liberian Legislature. Members of the Senate view the present condition of the Capital city of Liberia not up to standard as expected and are calling for immediate actions to prevent further garbage spread throughout the city. The Senate, in its plenary Thursday, June 13, 2013, mandated its Committee on Internal Affairs to have Acting Monrovia City Mayor Cllr. Henry Reed-Cooper and Acting Paynesville City Mayor Cyvette Gibson summoned. Both Mayors are expected to give reasons why both major cities are being swallowed by mountains of garbage stockpiles. Observers believe that Monrovia began to look filthy following the resignation of former Acting Monrovia City Mayor, Mary T. Broh who was hugely financially supported by national government and some international partners to keep Monrovia clean and green. Madam Broh was then replaced with former Chief Justice, Cllr. Henry Reed-Cooper who is currently heading the Management Team of the City of Monrovia, but according to the Senators, effort by the current team is not as effective as compared to the former City Mayor. The issue was first raised […]

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    Liberia: Mosquito Larvae Elimination – a Pragmatic Approach to Malaria Control Liberia: Mosquito Larvae Elimination – a Pragmatic Approach to Malaria Control

    Liberia: Mosquito Larvae Elimination – a Pragmatic Approach to Malaria Control

Liberia: Mosquito Larvae Elimination – a Pragmatic Approach to Malaria Control

On April 25 this year, World Health Organization (WHO) member countries especially those burdened by the malaria disease celebrated World Malaria Day. The annual celebration which began in 2007 is an opportunity for malaria affected countries and regions to share experiences, seek donor funding, and allow researchers and scientists to showcase advances in malaria control. In Liberia, the slogan for this year’s World Malaria Day was “Get Tested for Malaria before Treatment.” Implicit in the slogan is the focus on treatment not prevention. The centerpiece of Liberia’s malaria control program at the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare is the distribution of insecticide-treated mosquito bednets. While the use of insecticide-treated mosquito bed nets has proven to show positive outcome in malaria prevention, adopting it as the main malaria intervention strategy is insufficient and at best timid in the face of damning statistics on the toll of the disease on the Liberian population. A study by the United Nations International Children Emergency Fund (UNICEF) estimates that 3000 children under the age of 5 years die each day as a result of malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa. Liberia’s share of those deaths is eight children a day. In addition, there are countless prenatal and postnatal developmental problems suffered children when a mother infected with malaria passes the disease on to her unborn child. On an annual basis, GDP losses in Liberia as a result of the disease can be counted in the millions, according to another UNICEF study. When we put all of our eggs in one basket, so to speak, with the use of bednets as the key malaria prevention strategy, we are, in a sense, waving a flag of surrender to an insect. We are essentially […]

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    Liberia: Urgent Need for Medical Doctors Liberia: Urgent Need for Medical Doctors

    Liberia: Urgent Need for Medical Doctors

Liberia: Urgent Need for Medical Doctors

The Liberian Government has got more problems now perhaps than during the years of violence. The problems are multiple and hugely insurmountable in many respects, and it is glaring that the government does not have answers to all of them. The Unity Party-led government came to power in 2006, three years after the war ended in 2003. Most Liberians had thought that with the election of Madam Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf as president, she would have used her international contacts and influence to solve the problems. Honestly, she made some efforts in attracting the attention of the international community to focus on Liberia. It Is A fact that the current administration inherited some huge problems from past governments, but that does not alter the aphorism that government is continuity; therefore, this government is obliged to address the wishes and aspirations of the people. For Us, We believe that nothing is more critical than the health needs of the Liberian people. Our attention has been drawn to revelation made by Dr. Francis Karteh, head of the Jackson F. Doe Memorial Hospital in Tappita, Nimba County, that there are 150 medical doctors in the country to attend to the health needs of 3.5 million people. Dr. Karteh: “As I speak to you, Liberia has 150 medical doctors, and when you divide this number by the population (3.5 million people), it means that you will have one doctor to 30,000 persons, and this is not good for the development of the country.” Analytically, Dr. Karteh’s statement is reminiscent of a worst scenario in which the vast majority of the people do not have proper health care due to the brain drain in the medical profession. It is highly probable that […]

  • The father (in the yellow) of the 15 year old boy who died from a snake bite
    Snakebite = Fatality? Snakebite = Fatality?

    Snakebite = Fatality?

Snakebite = Fatality?

During a recent visit to Liberia, Africa, the Sahbu team ventured out to the remote village of Gbalala. Gbalala is a beautiful mud hut village that is not accessible by car or even motorcycle. Any type of medicine or health care is a day’s walk from Gbalala, and if a person is not able to walk or be carried, it’s an additional day’s travel back to town. The Sahbu team was saddened upon our arrival to learn of a 15 year old boy who had died the day before. The people of Gbalala, like each of the villages we visited on our trek, rely on the jungle for food. Common food sources found in the jungle are rice, various fruits, avocado, and the people hunt for deer, bush goat, and other sources of meat. The 15 year old boy had been hunting with a friend in the jungle close to their village. They had been stalking a bush goat which they had shot at previously. They came into the area they had pinpointed as the animal’s hiding place only to find a foxhole. The boy reached into the hole for the bush goat and instead a yellow snake instantaneously struck him three times in the wrist and forearm. The boy was injected with a large amount of poisonous venom such that he had lost his vision within 6 minutes and had passed away within 30 minutes. When poisonous snake venom is injected into the human cardiovascular system, there is usually time for the anit-venom to be given to the victim which is the only hope to save his/her life. In this area of Liberia, the anit-venom for the Yellow Snake is available but is only […]