Government Issues

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    Liberia: Ellen – We Want Quality Education, Not Assembly Lines of Graduates Liberia: Ellen – We Want Quality Education, Not Assembly Lines of Graduates

    Liberia: Ellen – We Want Quality Education, Not Assembly Lines of Graduates

Liberia: Ellen – We Want Quality Education, Not Assembly Lines of Graduates

President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf has raised alarm over the quality of training institutions in the country amid recent mass failure in the just released state run University of Liberia (UL) entrance results. She said while the government applauds the establishment of many institutions of learning, it is also concerned about the quality of training at all the institutions in the country. According to the Liberian leader, it is not sufficient to simply turn out graduates like an assembly line, but rather it is imperative to graduate young people who have received the quality of education that makes them marketable on the job market. President Johnson-Sirleaf made these comments Friday, August 30, 2013 at the 14th commencement exercises of the Stella Maris Polytechnic held at the Samuel Kanyan Doe (SKD) Sports Complex in Paynesville, outside Monrovia. “Let me say that while we applaud the establishment of many institutions of learning, we are also concerned about the quality of training in all institutions. We recognize that it is not sufficient to simply turn out graduates like an assembly line; rather, it is imperative to graduate young people who have received the quality of education that makes them marketable in the private sector,” the Liberian leader cautioned. “We realize that there is no quick fix to this crisis in public education. We acknowledge that we concentrated, in the early years, on enrolment because we wanted to get the children off the farms, out of the markets, from the roads and get them into schools. We did that, and enrolment throughout the country quadrupled. The problem, we found subsequently, was that the quality of education did not measure up,” she pointed out. “Education, especially quality education, is a magic wand; […]

Liberia Is Making History – New Bill to Minimize Corruption Clears Senate

The fight against corruption is gathering momentum in the House of Representatives, following the passage, by the Senate on 22 August 2013, of the Code of Conduct. This step represents a milestone in Liberian History, as the Code will conscientize all public officials and employees about good governance principles as they exercise their duties to the Liberian People and the State. The Legislature, civil society groups and the Governance Commission, which crafted the Bill, have thrown their weight behind the Code of Conduct Bill. The Governance Commission, a key player behind the Code of Conduct Bill, was set up as the Governance Reform Commission in 2003 during the Accra Comprehensive Peace Agreement “to address the overarching issues of governance in Liberia” by leading governance reforms through policy recommendations and implementation strategies that advance good governance reforms. “The Act of the National Legislature that created the Governance Commission mandates the institution “to promote good governance by advising, designing and formulating appropriate policies and institutional arrangements and frameworks required for achieving good governance and promoting integrity at all levels of Society and within every public and private institution”. Congratulating members of the Liberian Senate on the occasion of the passage of the Bill, Dr. Amos C. Sawyer, Chairman of the Governance Commission, said: “I am deeply gratified that the Senate has passed the National Code of Conduct Bill. Special thanks to those members who managed the Bill throughout the process leading to its passage, especially Senator Jewell Howard-Taylor and President Pro-Tempore Gbehzohngar Findley, who worked tirelessly with their colleagues for the passage of the Bill. “We now call on members of the House of Representatives to concur with the Bill so it can be submitted to the […]

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    The Most Corrupt Countries in the World The Most Corrupt Countries in the World

    The Most Corrupt Countries in the World

The Most Corrupt Countries in the World

More than half of the world’s population believes corruption in the public sector is a very serious problem. Liberia and Mongolia are the two most corrupt countries in the world, according to a recent study. In both countries, 86% of residents believe corruption in the public sector is a very serious problem. Residents in the vast majority of countries around the world believe corruption has only gotten worse in the past two years. Anti-corruption nonprofit Transparency International has released its 2013 Global Corruption Barometer, which surveyed residents in 107 countries. The world’s corrupt nations differ in many ways. Four are located in Africa, three in Latin America and two in Asia. These nations also vary considerably in size and population. Mongolia has just 3.2 million residents, while Mexico, Nigeria and Russia are three of the largest countries on the globe, each with more than 100 million people. Based on the percentage of surveyed residents that reported corruption in the public sector is a very serious problem, these are the world’s most corrupt nations. What many of these nations do have in common is that their people are largely opposed to corruption. Globally, 69% of people questioned by Transparency International said they would report corruption if they encountered it. In seven of the nine nations with the worst corruption, residents were at least slightly more likely to oppose corruption. In Paraguay, one of the countries with high corruption, 90% of citizens said they would report corruption, while 87% and 86% said they would do so in Mexico and Russia, respectively.

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    Sime Darby gets nod to clear land in Liberia Sime Darby gets nod to clear land in Liberia

    Sime Darby gets nod to clear land in Liberia

Sime Darby gets nod to clear land in Liberia

MONROVIA: Palm oil giant Sime Darby has received the green light from villagers in western Liberia to clear 5,000 ha of land for a plantation, after a non-governmental organisation have accused it of a land grab. A memorandum, signed at a ceremony in Grand Cape Mount County on Friday, gave villagers’ blessing for the company to develop the land with oil palm and rubber. It was witnessed by Liberian officials, civil society and traditional elders. Environmental lobbyist Friends of the Earth has accusedSime Darby of harming biodiversity and depriving farmers of their livelihoods with its development in the west African country. The company denied the accusation. Sime Darby has signed an agreement with Liberia to develop about 220,000 ha of land for 63 years. However, it has met resistance from some locals who accused the company of not properly informing them of the scale and implications of the project. — Reuters Source: Site

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    Liberia: Urgent Need for Medical Doctors Liberia: Urgent Need for Medical Doctors

    Liberia: Urgent Need for Medical Doctors

Liberia: Urgent Need for Medical Doctors

The Liberian Government has got more problems now perhaps than during the years of violence. The problems are multiple and hugely insurmountable in many respects, and it is glaring that the government does not have answers to all of them. The Unity Party-led government came to power in 2006, three years after the war ended in 2003. Most Liberians had thought that with the election of Madam Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf as president, she would have used her international contacts and influence to solve the problems. Honestly, she made some efforts in attracting the attention of the international community to focus on Liberia. It Is A fact that the current administration inherited some huge problems from past governments, but that does not alter the aphorism that government is continuity; therefore, this government is obliged to address the wishes and aspirations of the people. For Us, We believe that nothing is more critical than the health needs of the Liberian people. Our attention has been drawn to revelation made by Dr. Francis Karteh, head of the Jackson F. Doe Memorial Hospital in Tappita, Nimba County, that there are 150 medical doctors in the country to attend to the health needs of 3.5 million people. Dr. Karteh: “As I speak to you, Liberia has 150 medical doctors, and when you divide this number by the population (3.5 million people), it means that you will have one doctor to 30,000 persons, and this is not good for the development of the country.” Analytically, Dr. Karteh’s statement is reminiscent of a worst scenario in which the vast majority of the people do not have proper health care due to the brain drain in the medical profession. It is highly probable that […]