Education

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    Liberia: Ellen – We Want Quality Education, Not Assembly Lines of Graduates Liberia: Ellen – We Want Quality Education, Not Assembly Lines of Graduates

    Liberia: Ellen – We Want Quality Education, Not Assembly Lines of Graduates

Liberia: Ellen – We Want Quality Education, Not Assembly Lines of Graduates

President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf has raised alarm over the quality of training institutions in the country amid recent mass failure in the just released state run University of Liberia (UL) entrance results. She said while the government applauds the establishment of many institutions of learning, it is also concerned about the quality of training at all the institutions in the country. According to the Liberian leader, it is not sufficient to simply turn out graduates like an assembly line, but rather it is imperative to graduate young people who have received the quality of education that makes them marketable on the job market. President Johnson-Sirleaf made these comments Friday, August 30, 2013 at the 14th commencement exercises of the Stella Maris Polytechnic held at the Samuel Kanyan Doe (SKD) Sports Complex in Paynesville, outside Monrovia. “Let me say that while we applaud the establishment of many institutions of learning, we are also concerned about the quality of training in all institutions. We recognize that it is not sufficient to simply turn out graduates like an assembly line; rather, it is imperative to graduate young people who have received the quality of education that makes them marketable in the private sector,” the Liberian leader cautioned. “We realize that there is no quick fix to this crisis in public education. We acknowledge that we concentrated, in the early years, on enrolment because we wanted to get the children off the farms, out of the markets, from the roads and get them into schools. We did that, and enrolment throughout the country quadrupled. The problem, we found subsequently, was that the quality of education did not measure up,” she pointed out. “Education, especially quality education, is a magic wand; […]

Liberia: Proposing a National Education Conference

Given the shocking headlines of recent days, regarding the mass failure of applicants who sat the examinations for admission to the University of Liberia and taken into account the ongoing downward trend of Liberia’s education system, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said it is imperative to speak about the quality of education in schools today. President Sirleaf recalled that those of her age, who are old enough to remember, can look back fondly on their school days, and say they are proud of the quality education received. She said the educational system was then highly competitive and demanding where the schools, teachers, students and even the region competed for excellence. The Liberian leader noted that indiscipline and insolence were dealt with very firmly while cheating and other vices inimical to progress and productivity were not tolerated. Delivering the 14th commencement convocation of the Catholic- owned Stella Maris Polytechnic on Friday August 30, 2013, at the Samuel Kanyon Doe Sports Complex in Paynesville City, Dr. Sirleaf explained that while government applauds the establishment of many institutions of learning, it is also concerned about the quality of training in all institutions. The Liberian leader told the audience and the graduating class that government recognizes that it is not sufficient to simply turn out graduates like an assembly line; rather, it is imperative to graduate young people who have received the quality of education that makes them marketable in the private sector. Similarly, Central Bank of Liberia’s Executive Governor Dr. J. Mills Jones has said that it is important to have the will to hold accountable those responsible for reforming Liberia’s education system. Governor Jones said it cannot be overemphasized that quality education is sine qua non for development […]

Liberia: Massive Failure in UL Entrance

The administration of the University of Liberia has disclosed that no student passed in the entrance and placement examinations. Recently, the University of Liberia administered entrance exams to more than 24,000 students. At a press conference Wednesday, the head of UL Relations Dr. S. Momolu Getaweh said no student earned the scores of 50 percent in Math and 70 percent in English as previously set by the university as passing scores for the undergraduate examinations. Similarly, the administration of the University of Liberia also said no candidate who sat for the graduate programs for the Law School and School of Pharmacy exams scored 70 percent. The UL administration said holding these results constant, no candidate would have otherwise been admitted to the university for academic 2013/14 in the above programs. However, the UL said in the case of the A.M. Dogliotti College of Medicine where the score of 70 percent is required as passing grade, 47 candidates made 70 percent and above. Considering the massive failures, the UL administration said two separate meetings were held to find a way out. Dr. Getaweh said as a result of the meetings, the UL Senate reviewed several other scenarios below the benchmarks and recommended for the admission of 1,626 candidates who scored either at least 40 percent in Math and 50 percent in English in the undergraduate program. He disclosed that 25 candidates for the College of General Studies (Continuing Education), 93 candidates in the six graduate programs, 37 for the Law School and 24 for the School of Pharmacy were recommended for admission which has been endorsed by the Faculty Senate. However, the UL administration said candidates in the undergraduate division would be required to take two […]

A Touching Story About Quita

As you all know, the Sahbu team recently returned from a 10-day trip to Liberia. Their list of to do’s while over there was enormous. Each day was filled with traveling around to different villages and meeting with people to better understand how to help the children in need. One of the people they met with was a woman by the name of Quita. Quita is a powerful woman with a huge responsibility.  Founder of Borto Early Childhood Academy and an orphanage, she has quite the story to tell.  Quita lost three babies of her own during the 14 year-long civil war in Liberia, and now she feels God has given her a higher calling in life, which is to take care of the students in her school and the kids in her orphanage.  She believes that she lost her children so that she could have this other opportunity to take care of all the other kids in her school and orphanage. Many of the donations we receive here at Sahbu go directly to helping Quita in her efforts to educate and house underprivileged Liberian children.  Quita uses our donations to help pay for supplies, teachers’ salaries, and other school-related expenses. The opportunity Quita has provided for the kids in her school and orphanage has made a huge impact on their lives.  Although Sahbu has been working with Quita for the past several months, we were all touched to hear how she has overcome the trials in her life and dedicated herself to helping local kids in need. Liberia needs more people like her to care for and love the children who have been abandoned and left to have no chance at life.

Education is Key in Liberia

When Sahbu visited Liberia in October of 2012, they learned something…that education is the key to a better Liberia. Enjoy these interview snippets with squatters, child prostitutes, pastors, school founders, and students to learn more about the real life situations these people face in Liberia. Follow us on Facebook and visit our site.

Sahbu Accomplishes Goals in Liberia, West Africa

Sahbu founder, Mitch Weight, reflects on his experience at the conclusion of his last trip to Liberia. He talks about how big of a role education plays in the development of the culture. He discusses why Sahbu helps the people become educated and how that empowers them to change their own lives. It takes such little money to make huge progress. It is important to use the money to create opportunities and a future for the Liberian people.

Our Liberia To-Do List: Helping Kids Attend School

We want to see Liberia change. We want to see the country develop in a positive, peaceful way. The best way to accomplish this goal is by educating the children. Our team recently met with schools in Liberia and learned of the many challenges the children face as they seek an education. The great thing is, now that we understand the challenges, we are able to help. Below is our to-do list, to ensure children are able to receive the education they need.

Survival in the Liberian Jungle – Fatu’s Story

Fatu Miller is living her dream – attending the tenth grade at Bong Mines High School. Just a few months ago, her life consisted of burning coal, a tedious, difficult task. She, along with her brothers, would go into the bush and cut down a tree. Then, they would chop it up, wrap it in grass and leaves, and then drop the pieces into a freshly-dug hole. Next, they would start a fire and guard the hole for almost a week, night and day. Fatu and her brothers would take turns sleeping so their labors were not stolen. After almost a week of burning, the tree parts turned into coal, which they would sell for a very small amount of money. Fatu saved all the money she earned, in hopes of going back to school. Fatu joins Roselane in piloting Lifting Liberia’s Girls’ Enrichment Program in Bong County. The goal of the program is to provide an opportunity for girls in the outlying villages to receive an education. Like Roselane, Fatu is determined. She hopes to become an accountant one day. Her favorite subject is math.

The Power of Education – Oretha’s Success Story

It’s essential for parents and families to stress and prioritize education to their children Most children in Liberia grow up in extreme poverty and don’t even know if they will eat that day, let alone go to school. One young lady, Oretha Snyder Davis, shows us how education can change the future and break the poverty cycle. Oretha grew up in Liberia’s Montserado and Nimba Counties. Though her parents did not have much, they valued education and created a good foundation for Oretha and her 12 siblings. Her father died when she was only four years old, but Oretha’s mother raised all her children with a strong sense of core values, discipline and a firm foundation in the Bible. At the age of 18, Oretha completed high school and moved to the city of Monrovia to attend the University of Liberia where she obtained a bachelor’s degree. To pay her way through school, she sought work in the private sector. Oretha spent some time working in the oil industry, in the airline/travel industry, then eventually ended up spending 16 years working for the United Nations.

Sahbu Officials Working In Liberia to Provide Children with Educational Scholarships

Many children turn to crime and prostitution to afford food, water and an education. Every day in Liberia parents struggle to provide for their children. Education is considered a luxury when most families can’t even afford to put food on the table. Mitch Weight, founder of Sahbu, and his team are currently working in Liberia to further the country’s education and deliver school supplies, clothing and toys. “Without an education you are consigned to crime, prostitution or just working in the streets trying to find something to sell,” Weight said. Sahbu estimates that 60 percent of schoolgirls resort to having sex for cash in order to afford food, water and an education. These girls can be as young as 10 years old and sell themselves for as little as three U.S. cents.