Corruption

Liberia Is Making History – New Bill to Minimize Corruption Clears Senate

The fight against corruption is gathering momentum in the House of Representatives, following the passage, by the Senate on 22 August 2013, of the Code of Conduct. This step represents a milestone in Liberian History, as the Code will conscientize all public officials and employees about good governance principles as they exercise their duties to the Liberian People and the State. The Legislature, civil society groups and the Governance Commission, which crafted the Bill, have thrown their weight behind the Code of Conduct Bill. The Governance Commission, a key player behind the Code of Conduct Bill, was set up as the Governance Reform Commission in 2003 during the Accra Comprehensive Peace Agreement “to address the overarching issues of governance in Liberia” by leading governance reforms through policy recommendations and implementation strategies that advance good governance reforms. “The Act of the National Legislature that created the Governance Commission mandates the institution “to promote good governance by advising, designing and formulating appropriate policies and institutional arrangements and frameworks required for achieving good governance and promoting integrity at all levels of Society and within every public and private institution”. Congratulating members of the Liberian Senate on the occasion of the passage of the Bill, Dr. Amos C. Sawyer, Chairman of the Governance Commission, said: “I am deeply gratified that the Senate has passed the National Code of Conduct Bill. Special thanks to those members who managed the Bill throughout the process leading to its passage, especially Senator Jewell Howard-Taylor and President Pro-Tempore Gbehzohngar Findley, who worked tirelessly with their colleagues for the passage of the Bill. “We now call on members of the House of Representatives to concur with the Bill so it can be submitted to the […]

  • IMG_3656
    Liberia Police Cracking Down on Bribes Liberia Police Cracking Down on Bribes

    Liberia Police Cracking Down on Bribes

Liberia Police Cracking Down on Bribes

DAKAR, SENEGAL — Liberia’s police force says it is cracking down on officers demanding and accepting bribes, following the release this month of Transparency International’s 2013 Global Corruption Barometer report. The Transparency International report found 77 percent of people surveyed in Liberia paid a bribe to police in the past year. That has sparked outrage in Liberia, where motorists said policemen routinely demanded small bribes, or as they said in Monrovia, “a small thing before you go.” Liberia’s police spokesman, Sam Collins, said any officer taking a bribe would be fired and could face criminal charges. “Any attempt on the part of any officer to get involved in acts unbecoming of the police officer, that officer will be dealt with.  There will be no turning back,” he said. Drivers of commercial vehicles said they were particularly targeted by police looking for bribes. Driver Bull Davies said an officer can stop you for a violation, real or imagined, and demand payment of as much as $15 or 500 to 1,000 Liberian dollars. “They will threaten to give you a ticket or will not give you a ticket.  Then they will tell someone give me 1,000 or give me 500.  They will receive that 500 and they will not give a receipt.  They will not give you anything.  They receive it and they leave.  They gone,” he said. A commercial driver typically only earns about 1,000 Liberian dollars per day. But ex-policeman Morris Tamba said officers were also sometimes just trying to make ends meet. “If you are paid on time, [they] give you good salary on time, everything on time, the bribery will not be received as much as it is now.  The corruption will be eliminated.  Take an example.  […]

  • IMG_3607
    The Most Corrupt Countries in the World The Most Corrupt Countries in the World

    The Most Corrupt Countries in the World

The Most Corrupt Countries in the World

More than half of the world’s population believes corruption in the public sector is a very serious problem. Liberia and Mongolia are the two most corrupt countries in the world, according to a recent study. In both countries, 86% of residents believe corruption in the public sector is a very serious problem. Residents in the vast majority of countries around the world believe corruption has only gotten worse in the past two years. Anti-corruption nonprofit Transparency International has released its 2013 Global Corruption Barometer, which surveyed residents in 107 countries. The world’s corrupt nations differ in many ways. Four are located in Africa, three in Latin America and two in Asia. These nations also vary considerably in size and population. Mongolia has just 3.2 million residents, while Mexico, Nigeria and Russia are three of the largest countries on the globe, each with more than 100 million people. Based on the percentage of surveyed residents that reported corruption in the public sector is a very serious problem, these are the world’s most corrupt nations. What many of these nations do have in common is that their people are largely opposed to corruption. Globally, 69% of people questioned by Transparency International said they would report corruption if they encountered it. In seven of the nine nations with the worst corruption, residents were at least slightly more likely to oppose corruption. In Paraguay, one of the countries with high corruption, 90% of citizens said they would report corruption, while 87% and 86% said they would do so in Mexico and Russia, respectively.